The Hospital (1971) / Network (1976)

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By Scott Ross

Don’t ask me to choose a favorite between these two outrageous panegyrics by Paddy Chayefsky. In his gifts for dark comic exaggeration and exhilarating histrionic rhetoric, the late playwright had no peer, and these talents were never more manifest than in this pair of lacerating black farces. Contemporary critics were put off by Chayefsky’s occasionally hysterical (and, it was alleged, messianic and reactionary) takes on modern medicine and the corporatization of television, but as the years go by they seem positively prescient. It’s impossible to imagine these movies, with their rich verbal acrobatics, being made today, at least in Hollywood, and it’s no accident that Chayefsky won screenplay Oscars for both.

The Hospital has so many great actors in roles large and small that its ensemble, like that of All the President’s Men, is virtually a Who’s Who of 1970s thespic artists: George C. Scott, Diana Rigg, Barnard Hughes, Nancy Marchand, Frances Sternhagen, Roberts Blossom, Lenny Baker, Robert Walden, Richard Dysart, Katherine Helmond and Stockard Channing; Hughes is so good he’s got two roles, both marvelous.

“I am the fool for Christ, and Paraclete of Caborca.”

Network’s cast is equally stellar, with William Holden, Faye Dunaway, Peter Finch, Robert Duvall, Ned Beatty and Beatrice Straight firing off Chayefsky’s often achingly funny verbal eruptions in the leading roles. The number of Oscars awarded for the movie’s actors is a measure of the screenwriter’s abounding gifts: Finch, Dunaway and Straight were given statuettes (Finch posthumously), while Beatty — like Straight — was nominated for a single monologue.

“You have meddled with the primal forces of nature, and YOU… WILL… ATONE!”

Finch is superb, and his angry exhortation “I’m as mad as hell, and I’m not going to take this anymore!” became an instant catchphrase — ironic in that this seemingly populist watch-cry is uttered by a complete madman.

But it’s Holden who keeps the whole thing together, and — as in The Wild Bunch — his great, sad, worn and lived-in countenance at this stage of his life is one of the most moving faces in the movies. Network was his last major role in an important movie, and he gave it a lifetime’s passion. Arthur Hiller, never an inspired director, did well enough by The Hospital, as he did with Chayefsky’s great, underrated The Americanization of Emily, while Sidney Lumet filmed Network like a sly documentarian, tongue firmly in cheek.

Text copyright 2013 by Scott Ross

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